MG

Moderator
Please see T-SB-0008-20

Applicability:
1637504785572.png


Introduction:
Vehicles may display evidence of a fluid leak or fluid seep from powertrain components. This bulletin explains how to determine the differences between a fluid leak versus a fluid seep. Cases that are determined to be a “leak” should be repaired accordingly and will be covered under warranty if applicable. Cases that are determined to be a “seep” should be documented on the repair order and inspected at the next service interval. Follow the Repair Information in this bulletin to determine if the concern in question is a fluid leak or fluid seep and review the Repair Procedure section to address the condition.

Note:
This bulletin applies to ALL powertrain fluids excluding fuel and coolant

APPLICABLE WARRANTY:
• Warranty coverage is based on the failed component. Please refer to the Warranty Policy and Procedures Manual and the Powertrain Parts List for specific coverage. • Warranty application is limited to occurrence of the specified condition described in this bulletin.
These conditions are usually covered under your 5year/60,000 miles powertrain warranty or a CSP, LCS, SSC.

Warranty Claim Submission: Warranty Policy 4.21:
• ANY leak repair to be performed under warranty requires photo documentation of the active leak
• This Documentation showing the cause of defect MUST be created prior to the start of the repair and attached to the warranty claim.
• Photos MUST be clear and provide perspective image(s) that identify the affected component(s) and close up image(s) that illustrate the defect or condition.
• For additional information regarding application and eligibility please reference Warranty Policy 4.21

Repair Information:
Leak Definition

A leak is verified by the identification of pooling fluid with the formation of droplets and dripping. Below are examples determined to be a leak.
Below are examples determined to be a leak.:

1637505156220.png

1637505174958.png

1637505194799.png

1637505208594.png



Seep Definition
A seep is defined as a thin accumulation, film, or coating of oil on the exterior of a component. The area often has a darker or damp appearance compared to the rest of the part and may attract dust or dirt over time.

Note:
Seepage is a normal condition seen at mechanical joints that does not require repair but should be noted on the repair order for future reference.
Below are examples determined to be seepage.

1637513456940.png

1637513472543.png

1637513490170.png

1637513505415.png


Repair Procedure:
If a repair is needed, reference the information below to ensure an adequate repair:

1. AFTER disassembly, clean, inspect and prepare each sealing surface BEFORE reassembly:

A. For Joints Sealed with Gaskets/ O-Rings/ Seals:
(1) Clean: Remove ANY gasket material stuck to each sealing surface.
(2) Inspect: Check the sealing area for ANY surface imperfections (pitting, grooves, gaps, etc.) and replace part if necessary.
(3) Prepare: Remove ALL oil residue and wipe each surface with the appropriate cleaner and allow to dry.
(4) Install a NEW gasket and reassemble components per the applicable repair manual.

B. For Seal Packing/ Form in place Gasket (FIPG) Sealed Joints:
(1) Clean: Remove ALL sealant from each surface
(2) Inspect: Check the sealing area for ANY surface imperfections (pitting, grooves, gaps, etc. replace part if necessary)
(3) Prepare: Remove ALL oil residue and wipe each surface with the appropriate cleaner and an oil-free cloth. Allow to dry BEFORE applying new seal packing.
(4) Apply new seal packing to appropriate areas and reassemble components per the repair manual within 3 minutes of applying seal packing.
(5) Allow at least 2 hours AFTER installation BEFORE adding oil.

2. Confirm the repair is complete, test drive vehicle and make sure that there are no leaks from the repaired area.
 

Attachments

  • 1637513362893.png
    1637513362893.png
    65.2 KB · Views: 7
  • 1637513404632.png
    1637513404632.png
    98.8 KB · Views: 6
  • 1637513422135.png
    1637513422135.png
    111.2 KB · Views: 6

Lewis

Moderator
Staff member
Back when I was in school, they said that we couldn't upsell warranty work like this. The instructor talked about a "foot fault". We could only mention a repair under warranty if the problem would leave the customer stranded (i.e. the problem would leave them walking on feet). I still see techs in the shop recommending warranty work and getting paid. War never changes.
 

OishiiJPN

Moderator
Staff member
Back when I was in school
You are not old enough to be saying that. ;)
I still see techs in the shop recommending warranty work and getting paid
How else are they going to be earning a living? Just by recalls alone? 5K/10K svc's? I'm not saying it's right but having chewed that same dirt, I can at least know where they are coming from.
 
Top